Does Your Child Suffer With…

  • Growing Pains
  • Balance
  • Control
  • Coordination
  • Low muscle tone
  • Pigeon toed
  • Out-toed
  • Bow legs
  • Knocked knees
  • Stomach pains
  • Foot pains
  • Leg pains
  • Postural problems
  • Gait problems
  • Scoliosis

Are you worried about growing pains in your child’s feet? Do they trip or fall frequently or have pain on activity? The Podiatrists at Sydney Podiatry Practice are here to talk about your child’s foot care. We understand how important it is for active kids to have healthy and pain-free feet.

A child’s foot is different from an adult’s foot with respect to growth and pliability. Therefore, it is a crucial time in their development and proper footwear, health care and advice are important during these growing stages for your child.

When parents watch over their children’s growth, it is common to take them to a podiatrist to make a diagnosis of whether they think their child’s way of walking is strange. Specialized examinations and treatments by our expert Podiatrists are required.

Osgood Schlatter Syndrome

This condition is caused by irregularities in the rate of bone formation and growth of soft tissue. Osgood Schlatter Syndrome is identified by the presence of a lump at the base of the knee. It can be exacerbated by internal tibial rotation caused by pronation and results in knee pain originating at the top of the shin bone.

Growing Pains

‘Growing pains’ do not exist! If growing pains were a normal occurrence, then all children would experience it. This is not the case. ‘Growing pains’ are actually a biomechanical anomaly associated with growth spurts and can be treated.

Pigeon Toe and Out Toe

This condition is caused by irregularities in the rate of bone formation and growth of soft tissue. Osgood Schlatter Syndrome is identified by the presence of a lump at the base of the knee. It can be exacerbated by internal tibial rotation caused by pronation and results in knee pain originating at the top of the shin bone.

Sever’s Disease

This is not a ‘growing pain’ condition. Sever’s disease is associated with excessive pronation which affects the heels of children aged 9-12 years. There is a higher incidence among boys and very active children. It is characterised by soreness and tenderness at the rear of the heel, and the pain increases when the child stops running and when rising from the seated position.